Monday, May 12, 2014

100th Anniversary of Mother's Day

Yesterday marked the 100th anniversary of the official holiday of Mother's Day.

Whether you are a mother by birth and blood, or one of heart and soul, this day is for you.
And though the day is a gold mine for capitalism and commerce with the number of cards, flowers, and gifts purchased, it holds its roots in something much richer than gold.

Prior to the day it became an official celebration, Julia Ward Howe was one of the women who began a movement to unite mother's.

Julia Ward Howe

In the aftermath of the Civil War in the 1870's, the sacrifice of the nation's men was keenly felt and she wrote and distributed a poem calling women to unite against war.

 "A Mother's Day Proclamation" 

"Arise then...women of this day!
Arise, all women who have hearts!
Whether your baptism be of water or of tears!
Say firmly:
'We will not have questions answered by irrelevant agencies,
Our husbands will not come to us, reeking with carnage,
For caresses and applause.
Our sons shall not be taken from us to unlearn
All that we have been able to teach them of charity, mercy and patience.
We, the women of one country,
Will be too tender of those of another country
To allow our sons to be trained to injure theirs.' "

Howe, an abolitionist and suffragette, envisioned the post Civil War and the start of the Franco-Prussian War as a time for women to unite for peace and justice. In 1908 her efforts joined with those of Anna Jarvis to spark communities throughout New England to form Mother's Day gatherings and work clubs. The work clubs had roots started by Jarvis's mother as early as 1850. Though the commercialization of the holiday never matched the high ideals Jarvis had envisioned, today it remains a day to remember and thank your mother for all she is and does.

Anna Jarvis

Let us remember mother's around the globe who've suffered loss due to war or violence. 

Let us join our hearts and prayers for peace and healing. 

In particular, my heart goes out the mother's of Nigeria's stolen girls.

We, the women of one country, let us be tender of the women of another.

Let us pray.
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Blog post by Anne Love-
Writer of Historical Romance inspired by her family roots. 
Nurse Practitioner by day. 
Wife, mother, writer by night. 
Coffee drinker--any time.
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3 comments:

  1. I knew the president had declared it a national holiday but I never knew the history behind it. Thanks Anne.

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  2. You and I were on sort of the same wavelength today with our blog posts. :)

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  3. I wasn't aware of this history, either - thanks, Anne!! Yes, most of us mothers in the USA have few struggles in motherhood compared to those in some countries and should be in prayer for the trials of others!!

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