Friday, October 26, 2012

Book Report: No Safe Harbor by ELizabeth Ludwig


Elizabeth Ludwig's Now Safe Harbor will tug you in like a tugboat into the harbor! Setting the stage, she layers her plot masterfully until you'll find yourself sitting on the edge of your seat. Plot-driven and suspenseful, Elizabeth paints the picture of the Irish immigrant's world in old New York City.


Setting: You'll want to remember that 1897 New York City saw Ellis Island built just five years before and New York Harbor had only been under the watchful eye of the Statue of Liberty since 1886. The times were heavily influenced by the large influx of European immigrants, overcrowded tenement houses, an under paid labor force, and New York City's corrupt Tammany Hall political machine--all things in which the Irish were deeply involved!

Characters:
Cara Hamilton has left her Irish homeland, once believing she’d been orphaned, she glides into New York Harbor clinging to only a letter and the hope of finding her long lost brother. Her only instructions are to trust no one—talk to no one.
When her path crosses that of Rourke Turner, she yearns to entrust her secrets to someone who cares. But can Rourke choose between his clan and his heart to overcome the past that left him fatherless?

Romance & Plot:
Rourke is a bad guy you want to love, while Cara is an innocent you don’t want wounded—and yet Ludwig masterfully entwines their future, wrapping their paths to redemption into a cord that only the Lord’s strand between them can save. Forces beyond immigration far from their homeland, their penniless state, their fragile trust and clannish loyalties seek to divide the two. At one point, Cara’s actions not only surprised Rourke, but surprised me. However, true to her character, Cara is pressed to desperation to find her brother. So like Rourke, I saw this in Cara and had to forgive her foolishness. Be patient while Elizabeth introduces you to the cast of characters on this stage, there are none who aren’t essential!

Writing:
A few favorite lines:  (promise, no spoilers here!)
 “She studied him critically. His cheeks were ruddy, but that could easily have been caused by the brisk walk…..Certainly he didn’t look to be lying. Traitorous tears burned the back of her eyelids, accusing her of longing to believe him.”

Overall:
--Fresh new era & setting
--Intense & suspenseful
--Satisfying romance & ending

Bio: Elizabeth Ludwig is an award winning author whose work has been featured on Novel Journey, the Christian Authors Network, and The Christian Pulse. She is an accomplished speaker and teacher, and often attends conferences and seminars, where she lectures on editing for fiction writers, crafting effective novel proposals, and conducting successful editor/agent interviews. She is the owner and editor of the popular literary blog, The Borrowed Book. Along with her husband and two children, Elizabeth makes her home in the great state of Texas. To learn more about Elizabeth and her work, visit her at www.elizabethludwig.com.

Give Away: Elizabeth has graciously offered a free give away of a copy of No Safe Harbor. To participate you must live in the continental US, leave a comment. An entry will be made for every comment. Drawing will be announced on October 31st next week.
Comment questions: 
Have any of your ancestors immigrated through NYC? Do you know your country of origin?
A point for anyone who remembers what Tammany Hall was from history class or otherwise!
Have you been to NYC, seen Ellis Island, or the Statue of Liberty?

28 comments:

  1. I love this setting! Can't wait to read it, thanks for introducing me to someone new.

    I am very intrigued by Ellis Island and its history. I have been once and I hope to go again. My ancestors immigrated from the Netherlands. My Dad was the first generation born in the US.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Wow Lisa, you probably still have close cousins in the Netherlands!

      I've never been to Ellis Island, but I'd love to go.

      Delete
  2. Yeah!! Another great giveaway!! I'm getting this book in the mail soon and can't wait to read it :)

    ReplyDelete
  3. Hi Lisa and Ann,

    The only relative I know about immigrated from Scotland, and she arrived in New Orleans. I was in New York only for part of a day when I was flying to Israel. I hope to go back one day and see all the sites, especially the historical ones.

    Tammany Hall was some kind of political society--or building, I think.

    Can't wait to read this new book, Lisa. I love redeemed bad boy stories.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hey Vickie ... I haven't been able to scour the historical sites of NY yet either. Maybe we should plan a writer's adventure trip! :)

      Delete
  4. This sounds like a fantastic book! I've never been to Ellis Island, but would like to some day.

    From what I understand Tammany Hall was political organization that also helped immigrants get situated in the US by informing then about society and becoming citizens.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hey, Mel! I'd like to visit Ellis Island at night. Wouldn't that be creepy? :) Let's go!

      Delete
    2. Melissa, you are the WINNER OF THE FREE GIVE AWAY!!!!!
      We need your email.

      Delete
  5. Replies
    1. yes, I believe you do. Since I'm determined to convert you to historicals :)

      Delete
  6. Hello, friends!! Thank you all for stopping by today to chat about NO SAFE HARBOR!

    For those of you who are interested, here is some information on Tammany Hall:

    The Tammany Society was founded in New York City in 1789 by William Mooney, a Revolutionary War veteran. It drew its name from a respected Delaware chief, Tammend or Tamanend, who had reportedly befriended William Penn. The Society, sometimes called the Columbian Order, was originally a patriotic and charitable organization.

    In 1798, Aaron Burr helped to mold the organization into a political force dedicated to anti-Federalist principles. This partisan group was used effectively to support Burr and Thomas Jefferson in the Election of 1800.

    A watershed event occurred in 1817 when the Irish managed to force their way into membership in Tammany. The practice of exchanging votes for benefits quickly became the organization's backbone. In 1830, the group's headquarters were established in Tammany Hall and thereafter the name of the association and the location were synonymous.

    Tammany Hall elected its first mayor, Fernando Wood, in 1855. New York City would be governed by Tammany forces for the next 70 years with only a few short interruptions. In 1868, William Marcy Tweed headed Tammany and ushered in an era of extreme corruption. Tweed was successful with making the organization a statewide force, but was eventually brought down by a reform attorney, Samuel J. Tilden.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Hey Lisa, have you checked out the National Park Service website? They have some AMAZING information, videos, and links regarding Ellis Island, Liberty Island, and the Statue of Liberty. You can find it here: http://www.nps.gov/stli/planyourvisit/statue2012reopening.htm

    ReplyDelete
  8. I love the cover of this book! Really draws me in. :)

    My husband and I have visited Ellis Island. It was surreal to think about how many immigrants passed through there.

    ReplyDelete
  9. Hey Lindsay,

    I agree! I'm in the process of collecting testimonies and photos from people who experienced it to add to my website. Incredible to think of all they endured!

    ReplyDelete
  10. Thanks for stopping by Elizabeth! I loved your little tidbits about Tammany. I figured my high school history teacher would be proud I'd even remembered anything at all about it!.He used to give us 10 point quizes worth 100 pts each--that I'll never forget!

    ReplyDelete
  11. Yes! I do know that my Norwegian and Swedish ancestors immigrated through NYC in the late 1800's. I wish I knew more about what brought them to America and what their lives were like before they came. I remember a bit about Tammany Hall from high school-- but actually more from BJ Hoff's book Song of Erin. It was an extremely powerful Democratic organization in New York. They helped many Irish rise to powerful positions.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Very neat Lisa! Norwegian and Swedish, cool. I love family history stories. I've not read BJ Hoff's book you mentioned. I'll have to check it out.

      Delete
  12. Hi...I have never been to Ellis Island , but I have been doing a little research on it. I was fascinated to learn that single women had to have a male sponsor them. If no man spoke for them they had to stay at Ellis Island til they could arrange amarriage of convenience or a guarantee of employment.
    kristine(dot)morgan(@)yahoo(dot)com

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Oh that is rich history rife with all sorts of interesting twists and turns. Sometimes truth really is stranger than fiction. Makes you think a man might just hang out at the harbor--both the good men seeking a wife, and the bad kind too.....Hmmmm.

      Delete
  13. This book sounds like a winner! :)

    ReplyDelete
  14. Waving Dana! Your name goes in the hat for the draw! :o)

    ReplyDelete
  15. Hi, Dana!! Thanks for stopping by. Good luck!

    ReplyDelete
  16. Ohh, sounds great!! I haven't read anything by this author, I don't think. :) Historical fiction is definitely my favorite genre-- I learn so much! :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Oh.. and no to answer the questions you've asked. I haven't been to NY/Ellis Island/ etc. I don't know where my ancestors are from (would LOVE to, but family isn't very knowledgeable/open about it all). We are Scottish decent.... but I'm not sure what else.

      Delete
  17. I haven't been there either Ladette. I would like to some day. Yes, Jaime and I are HUGE historical geeks! :)

    ReplyDelete

Hey friend! Please leave a comment, no lurking allowed ;)